Black Tie


For some reason Black Tie invitations today seem to mean that one can wear anything approximating black, or anything approximating a tie. (The tie means bow tie, by the way, not a black necktie.) It’s a shame, really, and the parade of celebrities wearing atrociously ugly versions of tuxedos at award ceremonies serves to only encourage men to take liberties with their dress that they shouldn’t. Of course certain liberties can show a sense of style, even whimsy, without offending the sensibilities of the style police.
My father’s tux, which I’ve inherited, is an early 1970′s Aquascutum, but the style is as fresh today as it was forty years ago (well, my father was pretty conservative in his dress, which meant his suits could outlast most trends). A single button peak lapel jacket and straight leg, no pleats trousers, is pretty straightforward, except the fabric has a black-on-black paisley pattern, almost invisible until either light shines on it, or you get really close. The paisley is a classically Persian design—and my father was happy to advertise his heritage, however subtly. And yes, it comes with a cummerbund, which just happens to be the Persian word for belt.

Labels: Fashion, Re-purposed, Style     permalink

2 thoughts on “Black Tie

    • I think so, Andreas, if the tux is a single breasted model. At least that’s what I prefer, but I can see someone discarding the cummerbund, with the right shirt and pants, and getting away with it! (Of course with a double breasted tux, a cummerbund is not only not necessary, it’s wrong.)

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

* Copy this password:

* Type or paste password here: